George Soros

"The man who broke the Bank of England"

In politics and economics, Black Wednesday refers to 16 September 1992 when the British Conservative government was forced to withdraw the pound sterling from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM) after it was unable to keep the pound above its agreed lower limit in the ERM. George Soros, the most high profile of the currency market investors, made over 1 billion GBP[1] profit by short selling sterling.

In 1997 the UK Treasury estimated the cost of Black Wednesday at £3.4 billion,[citation needed] with other sources giving estimates as high as £27 billion. In 2005 documents released under the Freedom of Information Act revealed that the actual cost may have been £3.3 billion.[2]

The trading losses in August and September were estimated at £800 million, but the main loss to taxpayers arose because the devaluation could have made them a profit. The papers show that if the government had maintained $24 billion foreign currency reserves and the pound had fallen by the same amount, the UK would have made a £2.4 billion profit on sterling's devaluation.[3][need quotation to verify] Newspapers also revealed that the Treasury spent £27 billion of reserves in propping up the pound.

Time for light to travel from the core of the sun to us = 100,000 years 8 minutes

We know it takes eight minutes for light to travel from the sun’s surface to the Earth, which is a pretty casual way of saying something that reshaped our universe when we worked it out. But it takes 100,000 years for that light to reach the sun’s surface from the core. The light is continually absorbed and re-emitted through the gigantic ball of nuclear fire, in the solar system’s biggest game of pass-the-parcel, where the parcel is almost all the energy you’ve ever used. One-hundred-thousand years. Neutrinos make the same trip in about two seconds.

Busking

Another word for a street performance.

Street performance or busking is the practice of performing in public places, for gratuities.[1] In many countries the rewards are generally in the form of money but other gratuities such as food, drink or gifts may be given. Street performance is practiced all over the world by men, women and children and dates back to antiquity. In English-speaking countries people engaging in this practice are called street performers or buskers.

Performances can be just about anything that people find entertaining. Performers may do acrobatics, animal tricks, balloon twisting, caricatures, clowning, comedy, contortions, escapology, dance, singing, fire skills, flea circus, fortune-telling, juggling, magic, mime, living statue, musical performance, puppeteering, snake charming, storytelling or reciting poetry or prose, street art such as sketching and painting, street theatre, sword swallowing, and ventriloquism.